FigJam
Be a changemaker with the change control template

Whether you’re deep in a project or just wading in, sometimes a change request can do you good. Stay light on your feet with a change control plan from FigJam.

five colorful rectangular shaped text boxes used to control the outcome of a workflow or processfive colorful rectangular shaped text boxes used to control the outcome of a workflow or process

Change control template

Map out your change management plan and find flexible solutions on a clarifying, shareable template.

Change for the better

Don’t shortchange your team—identify what needs to change and who needs to do it for the most efficient, organized processes.

Plot the change: List out concrete steps to effectively shift the scope of your project.

Refine initial ideas: Draft your proposed change management process and share it with collaborators for review before implementation.

Nip it in the bud: Veto unnecessary or disruptive changes during the planning stage to save on collective energy and resources.

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two arrows forming a circle overlayed on top of colorful rectangle shapestwo arrows forming a circle overlayed on top of colorful rectangle shapes

FigJam
Collaboration, for a change

Every project and product requires a bit of fixing-up eventually. Jot down strategic shifts with Lil Notes, assess the data with an easy-to-read table, and nail down key milestones or a successful change with Timeline. With FigJam’s collaborative change control process template, you can find all the cracks—smooth them over for good.

FAQs

To write a change control process, begin by opening a customizable change control example template from FigJam. On your template, you can go ahead and draft recommendations for changes that cover potential benefits, outcomes, and risk factors. Then, once you’ve hashed out your proposal, you can loop in team members and stakeholders for feedback.

If your proposed change meets some resistance, you can revise your recommendation accordingly. If it’s approved and implemented, on the other hand, you might want to log some notes on your change control plan. How did this example of change control go? What would you do differently next time?

Filling out change control examples is a six-step process that begins with a request for a change and, hopefully, results in increased efficiency and communication.

So, what are the six steps in the change control process? Here they are, from first to last:

- Recommendations: Gather your team and throw out ideas for change. Create detailed proposals for the most promising suggestions.

Client review: Share the proposals with clients and stakeholders to align your vision.

- Plans rejected: Decide which plans to toss out.

- Plans approved: Decide which plans your team will implement.

- Application: Write a detailed timeline with deliverables and delegated responsibilities to execute the plan.

- Reflection: Evaluate any feedback, celebrate your wins, and propose changes to the process.

A change control process example serves three main purposes.

1. Change control streamlines corrective action by clearly defining the changes that need to be made.

2. Change control prevents further problems from occurring as your team learns consistent, clearly defined processes.

3. Change control aims to lower costs, especially when it comes to maintenance.

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